Committing to Leveling Up

I am really late with this update and post but I have been so busy trying to plan out other things in my life, my blog took a back seat.

Back in 2016 when I began revamping my blog, I just knew that I was going to take off, monetize, and be the best in the game.  I wanted to take over in my niche—education and lifestyle— and set the internet on fire.  Guess what!! I fail at that.  It’s not because I feel that the blogging market is saturated, I just truly have yet to establish my fool proof systems.  There are a lot of things I’d like to do with my blog—I just need to take some time to refocus my energy on my leads and stick to them.  To be honest I just felt like a lot of the stuff was too gimmicky and I had completed so much “research” I was stressing myself out.  So I have decided to return to just simply being me and telling my stories my way.  Sharing my trials and triumphs and perhaps along the way help someone.

I have to take a second and laugh at myself because back during Christmas break I completed an online Goals Success Coach certification, and I have content I just need to put that content into action.  Back in 2017, I wrote a cute little goal setting book, Brown Sugar Magic as a personal challenge and really truly had no strategic plan on how to market it.  Anyway, since completing that book I have dove into other endeavors and book writing is still calling my name.

See when I published my first book, I began to realize the power of telling my story and being unafraid to face the criticisms of others.  I took a few hits, but my stories from my first book are truly a testament of how far I have come.  Not only did I want to take the world by storm and create a gravitating blog, I also wanted to be set apart as an author.  In an effort to be completely transparent I have had people try to use my words against me as if my story is not mine to tell, personally and professionally.  I am at a point now in my career where I have to level up all the way around in all of my work, because people are taking notice and I have to show up.

Yes, I thought my first two books would fly off of the shelves and be a continuous stream of downloads but I have realized that my inconsistencies in my writing have been my down fall.  So now I have to do everything in my power to extend my buzz and capitalize off of my name and who I am setting myself up to be.

As I am completing my third book, 12 Ways to Survive Your First Year of Teaching, there are some logistics to be laid out as Dr. Williams prepares to shock this time around.  After turning 37, I have wanted to venture out into other things and I’ll be speaking that Teacher’s Self-Care Conference in June and I can’t wait.  I’m in my 11th year of teaching and this by far has been my most difficult year to date.  I’m not motivated and I am sure that that energy is transferring into my delivery, but at this point, it is what it is.  The plan is set in motion, between my books and defining my systems, I have three short years to transition out of teaching and becoming a full-time entrepreneur.

No matter what, at this point, I just have to keep telling my story and demand that people take notice.  I have been saying this over the years and it’s beginning to sink in, “Being me is my super power!”  I try my hand at a lot of different things.  I’m willing to take the risk and try something new because I am not afraid of challenges.  After all I did seek to get a Doctorate in Education for the thrill of seeing if I could actually complete the degree.  It may have taken me five years, but I know that my credentials can not ever be stripped from me.

I have sacrificed so much of my time into fruitless things that I have decided to change the trajectory of my existence.  I will be that woman….every woman…I’ve realized that many people will question your choices in life while they are too afraid to DECIDE which direction their life is going. Success is not determined by the opinions of others, but the self gratifying feeling you get when you DECIDE to LIVE.  I will continue to build my resume and level up in all areas in my life.

~LaTilya Rashon

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4 Reasons Teachers Face “Burnout”

The many misconceptions about teaching is that the career field is easy.  I have written about the 9 Reasons Education is Confusing but right I want to tackle a topic that is close to home, “teacher burnout”.  Inside the walls of a school, there are decisions being made that rattle the adults more than the kids and it makes completing your tasks each day extremely difficult.  If you ever wondered why teachers throw in the towel to an easily assumed career, this blog discusses the 4 reasons teachers face “burn out”.

Meetings

Each academic year is started off with a big meeting, “Convocation” in most places where teachers get a pep talk and inspirational thank you’s for their commitment to the school district and profession.  Some teachers are engaged in the long, drawn out meeting, some steal away to the restroom midway through the keynote speaker’s address because the formality of convocation is boring, and new teachers take it all in as an exciting experience.  

Convocation is the first of many meetings to come. At your school all of these committees and teams are formed, in conjunction with content area meetings, district level professional learning and training, staff meetings, grade level meetings and school-wide professional learning; teachers begin to ask when will they have time to work on content that they were hired to teach.  Meetings and micromanagement does not work for teachers that want autonomy of their classroom.

Lack of Support

When problems begin to arise in the school, teachers think back to all of the meetings that have been held about procedures.  There are protocols put in place that tells you how to handle situations.  But when you see that disturbances are handled on a case by case basis and situational depending on the involved parties, there is a breakdown in how teachers feel supported.  When teachers feel that they are not being supported based on what they have been told, more and more teachers walk away from the profession.

Paperwork/Documentation: Teachers and Students

The amount of paperwork that teachers are introduced to makes you wonder what exactly have you signed on to do.  The universal screeners, individual education plans, behavior intervention plans, red tabs, discipline trackers, and parent contact logs must be in place to make sure students are receiving the right services required of teachers.  But if teachers are negligent in their duties, they are tracked by means of code of ethics violations and personnel files that are kept at the school level, that then can be turned over to the local board of education for termination issues.  It is a bit cumbersome to progress monitor behavior issues in a classroom where multiple behavior issues exist, and teachers are drowning in lesson plans and parental contact. One false statement or wrong signature can cause you your livelihood.

Environment

Staying in the same place for too long can be detrimental to one’s mindset and causes lack of motivation to stay in the profession.  Change is good for anyone, and in this generation of students, the complexities that they face in life are far more different than what educators ever imagined.  In at-risk, poverty stricken, low-socioeconomic status populations; homelessness, abuse, death, and previous retention of students consume work environments.  Sometimes students have experienced so much, they come to school as a formality just waiting to turn 16 and dropout.

As an educator this is heartbreaking, and witnessing so much tragedy, and seeing the generations of students diminish in talent and respect, you find yourself wanting to do something new.  Teachers may not be able to control the environment, but they leave it behind in pursuit of something better.

Ironically, a lot of teachers are taking their skills and transferring them to different fields such as writing books and other entrepreneurial endeavors. I myself am working on my third book on the ways to survive teaching your first year as a newbie. I love what I do, but I’m feeling the burn.

~LaTilya Rashon